Help For Sleep Deprived New Moms

Sleep Deprived New Moms

There is help available for sleep-deprived mothers that allows moms to rest easier, experience increased energy and have an improved sense of overall well-being.

Sleep deprivation is no fun for new moms and potentially affects the mother’s health and sense of well-being. These tips will help mothers learn how to get more sleep and feel more rested.

Sleep When Baby Sleeps

When a mom first comes home from the hospital, the home may initially seem chaotic, especially if there are older children in the home who also need mom’s attention. Helping with homework, preparing family meals and doing laundry along with taking care of a newborn that needs to be fed every few hours likely results in a new mother feeling sleep deprived.

The best time for mom to sleep is usually when the baby is sleeping. However, it is imperative to remember the danger of putting a baby in bed with a parent. Put baby down in their own crib, with mom sleeping nearby, to potentially experience the best sleep quality. Once the baby extends the time between feedings, the baby and mom can enjoy a more regular sleeping schedule, resulting in less sleep-deprivation.

Sleep When The Kids Are In School

Mothers sometimes stay up late, cleaning from the day’s activities, preparing school lunches and planning for the next day. When you finally drag yourself to bed, there may be only a few hours left to sleep before the alarm wakes you up.

If you are a new mother with school-age children, sleeping while the kids are in school likely helps reduce feeling sleep-deprived. Taking a short nap while the kids are in school and while baby takes a nap helps you get the sleep you need and helps provide the energy boost needed to get through the rest of the day.

Turn Off The Phone

When sleep-deprived moms try to catch a short nap, repeatedly answering phone calls, reading or responding to text messages disrupts sleep. Avoid these calls and answer only in case of emergency when you go to bed for the night or take a nap.

Eat A Healthy Diet

Moms of all ages are often constantly on the go and may not eat a healthy diet, even skipping one or more meals completely. If you are a new mom who wants to have enough energy to get through the day, wants to lessen the risk of stress and increase overall sense of well-being, eat a healthy diet.

Skipping meals and then trying to sleep has the potential of resulting in an inability to sleep due to hunger. Avoid heavy meals shortly before going to bed.

Establish Bedtime Routine

The Parents Magazine article “Sleep Deprivation After Baby” discusses sleep difficulties that moms often experience. Author Denise Porretto suggests that new mothers establish a bedtime ritual such as doing the same task or activity each night shortly before bedtime.

Whether you take a bath at about the same time every night, read a book or lay out your clothes for the next day, you learn to associate specific tasks or activities with the fact that it is time for bed.

Remember that eating a healthy diet helps sleep-deprived moms feel better and sleep better. When a new mother takes care of herself along with her children, the mother increases the chance of having overall better health, compared to new moms who do not sleep at optimal times and who fail to eat properly and exercise.

Following a few simple tips allows sleep-deprived moms to reduce or potentially overcome sleep deprivation, likely resulting in a happier, healthier new mom and new baby.

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